Big Mountains, Big Lines in Canada

Amalgam community member, Jamie Walter, reports from British Colombia.

Deep powder, eh? 

Deep powder, eh? 

I CANNOT LIE, having a job as a ski photographer is a dream come true. My “job” gives me the opportunity to travel the world, chasing the best snow with some of the greatest winter sport athletes. My first trip of the 2016-17 season brought me to British Columbia with two-time Olympic Gold Medalist Seth Wescott. Seth is a killer snowboarder, entrepreneur, and rad human being, who invited me on a last minute adventure to Whitecap Lodge outside of Whistler, BC.

You gotta get up to get down.

You gotta get up to get down.

Whitecap Lodge sits in McGillivray Pass, located 40 miles northeast of Whistler. It’s an amazing retreat, based around a rustic and cozy lodge built back in the 1970’s. Surrounded by legendary terrain, my favorite part of the experience was the fact that everything was accessed via ski touring. There were countless lines, zones, and peaks to ski from, and the only thing limiting you from the run of your life is how much effort you want to put in. 

How 'bout that ride in?

How 'bout that ride in?

Access to Whitecap Lodge requires a 10 minute helicopter ride from the nearby town of D’Arcy, and once the sound of that heli fades away after dropping you off, you’re left with the silence of the mountains. The company at the lodge was fantastic - Ron, one of the owners, “Mim,” the resident cook for our trip, and the rest of the guide staff (Including Kitt, Seth’s wife) were all top notch people with great stories to share during down time. 

Despite bone chilling, sub zero temperatures during our stay, we got several laps in each day. This trip was the first test for my Amalgam Sentient 185’s, and boy oh boy did they live up to the excitement. The ski was everything I could have asked for - stable and sturdy in the wind buffed snow but floaty in the deeper fresh stuff. And as a touring ski, the weight of my setup never once slowed me down. When you’re chasing after one of the world’s fastest snowboarders, it’s nice to have a steady ski that rips it just as hard as he does.

The Sentient seen in its natural habitat.

The Sentient seen in its natural habitat.

Words and photos by Jamie Walter